Argentina

Argentina

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My first international trip for 2019

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I’m so excited I’m finally going on my first international trip of the year. I’ve been planning this trip since August of last year and the time has finally come! My friend Emily, who I met in college asked me to go to Madrid with her last February. I’ll be in Argentina for 5 days, I leave Wednesday but won’t arrive till Thursday.

My trip to Madrid with her was last-minute and spontaneous. I don’t remember what exactly happened, but she had texted me and I was asking her what she was up to and we ended up talking about her trip to Madrid. She told me what dates she was going and I realized I had those dates off so I jumped on the opportunity to go with her and went (this all went down in three weeks).

This time around it was a bit more planned out. I’ve known since August after we had talked about going on another trip together. She mentioned she had already booked this trip to Argentina and asked if I wanted to join, and she knew I was going to say yes.

Tomorrow I’ll be flying to Buenos Aires through LAX on American Airlines. I’ll be making sure to take notes and get back to you on my experience flying American. This will be my first time flying American internationally (I’ve only flown them going from Seattle to NYC). The flight is about 12 hours long and I’m preparing myself for this.

Here are a few things I always bring on my carry-on:

  • Headphones
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Sanitizer Wipes
  • Sleep Mask
  • Glasses case
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste

(Pro tip: If you travel with medicine, make sure to always bring your medicine with you in your carry-on in case your checked luggage gets lost).

This is my second time going to South America, the first time was in 2012 when I went to Venezuela for a mission trip. So this will be my first time going as a tourist.

We don’t have much planned yet but I have a few things planned and made a few reservations to a few different restaurants that I want to try (can’t wait to blog about it later!).

Sorry for this vague blog post, but I don’t want to give away too many spoilers for this trip, as I’ll probably do quite a lot of blog posts about it. I’ll be posting photos of my food adventures on my food instagram here and my new travelgram that I just launched, which you can follow here.

Catch you back in America!

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Black History Month Spotlight: Wangari Maathai

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Happy Black History Month! I wanted to spotlight different women this month as a way to honor them, remember them and hopefully inspire other women. My second spotlight of the month is Wangari Maathai. The next spotlight will be Lorraine Hansberry.

In my opinion, Wangari Maathai is one of the most notable women in this generation who does not get as much recognition as she deserves. She is the first Black woman to receive a Nobel Peace Prize.

Wangari Maathai was born in Kenya and became the first woman in East and Central Africa to receive a doctoral degree (Nobel Peace Prize). She served on the National Council of Women in Kenya and it was during this time that she founded the Green Belt Movement (Green Belt Movement).

The Green Belt Movement is an organization that empowers communities, particularly women, to work towards conserving the environment and improving their lives. Maathai founded the environmental organization to address the issue of having streams drying up, food supplies being less secure. By planting seedlings, the women are able to store rainwater, provide food and firewood and receive a monetary token for their work (Green Belt Movement).

Conservation work wasn’t her only passion, Maathai was also an advocate for human rights, AIDS prevention and women’s issues. She addressed these issues in front of the United Nations General Assembly frequently. In 2002 she was elected to Kenya’s National Assembly and in 2003 she was appointed Assistant Minister of Environment, Natural Resources and Wildlife (Britannica). In 2004 she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the first Black woman to receive the award.

Since being award the Nobel Peace Prize, Maathai published an autobiography of her journey. She was also appointed the Goodwill Ambassador to the Congo Basin Forest Ecosystem. In 2006 she founded the Nobel Women’s Initiative (Green Belt Movement).

Maathai passed away in 2011 due to ovarian cancer.

Here are some books to read more about her:

Sunshine Blogger Award

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Earlier this month I was nominated by The Newbury Girl for the Sunshine Blogger Award. I am extremely honored for this recognition.

Sunshine Blogger Rules

  • Thank the blogger who nominated you in a blog post and link back to their blog
  • Answer the 11 questions the blogger asked you
  • Nominate (at least) 11 blogs to receive the award and write them 11 new questions

Newbury Girl Questions

1.What is your biggest blogger goal for 2019?

My biggest blogger goal for 2019 is to continue to create meaningful content. I want my content to be relatable.

2. What is the best advice you received as a blogger?

The biggest advice I received as a blogger was to not burnout. As a new blogger there is a desire to put out a lot of content to gain followers fast, but then you risk burning out and running out of ideas. I’ve been taking it slow and only blogging once or twice a week (slow and steady eh?) (I’m not Canadian I just wanted to say eh.) 

3. What are you most looking forward to in 2019?

I’ve got some really great trips planned this year and I’ve been working a lot on my own personal journey. I did a lot of soul searching last year and now this year is my time to heal and grow and repair myself.

4. What was your least favorite song from 2018?

Honestly any song by Cardi B, not because I don’t like her but because I cannot understand any of the lyrics.

Who was the first artist/musician you saw in concert?

DO I ADMIT WHO I FIRST SAW OR DO I LIE? This is so Seattle of me but the first concert I saw was Modest Mouse in 7th grade. Hahahah okay bye.

Are you a morning person or a night owl?

I’m such a night owl it’s crazy. I love the night, make me get up at 6am and I’ll be dead.

Pick one: Netflix, Hulu, or HBO?

Oh this is hard, but HBO. Unless I have Hulu with HBO added on, then I choose Hulu with HBO.

Pick one: Snapchat, Instagram, or Twitter?

Yo why you gotta make me choose. I love them all, no discrimination. But if I really had to choose Instagram is great. I can use it show off my amateur photography skills.

If you could wake up tomorrow speaking another language, what would it be?

Chinese 100% it’s my mother language and my only regret that I can’t speak it. 

If you could have dinner with anyone, dead or living, who would it be?

Oh Thurgood Marshall for sure. He’s one of the most fascinating person I’ve ever read about.

Share your favorite post from 2018. Why is this your favorite?

My favorite blog post is Vancouver Day Trip because it was such a fun trip and I had a blast. Also who doesn’t love road trips? And shoutout to Chelsea for reading my blog, always supporting me and being a great friend. 

My Questions (all travel related)

  1. If you could go anywhere in the world where would it be?
  2. If you live anywhere, where would it be?
  3. What is your favorite travel memory?
  4. After a long day of traveling, what is the first thing you do once you get there?
  5. Do your prefer road-tripping or flying?
  6. What is the most adventurous food you’ve tried while traveling?
  7. How do you choose the next place you are going visit?
  8. If you could only travel to one country which one would it be?
  9. What do you think is the biggest barrier for why people don’t travel as much?
  10. If you could only travel with one person for the rest of your life, who would you choose?
  11. What’s your favorite comfort food when you are traveling?

My Nominations:

  1. Bill @ A Silly Place 
  2. Cynthia @ Adventuring Woman
  3. Irine @ Travel with Irine
  4. Allie @ Allie Wanders
  5. 1Adventure Traveler
  6. Analytical Traveler
  7. Lily @ Anchoring Away
  8. Madelene @ InBetweenSC
  9. Angelica’s Travels
  10. The Impulsive Traveler
  11. Captain Jetson

Black History Month Spotlight: Ida B. Wells

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Happy Black History Month! I wanted to spotlight different women this month as a way to honor them, remember them and hopefully inspire other women. My first spotlight is Ida B. Wells.

I choose Ida B. Wells as my first spotlight. Ida B. Wells was considered one of the most famous African-American woman in the United States during her time. She was a powerful journalist that pioneered reporting techniques that are still implemented today (NYT obituary).

Wells was born into slavery in Mississippi. After yellow fever swept through her town, killing her brother and her parents, Wells moved her siblings to Memphis and worked as a teacher to provide for them (Women’s History). After her move to Memphis, Wells was arrested for sitting in an all-white Women train car, despite having a ticket. Wells sued and won her case, however it was overturned in the Tennessee Appeals Court.

In Memphis, Wells co-founded a newspaper called The Free Speech and Headlight. Through this newspaper, she wrote articles condemning violence against blacks, disenfranchisement, poor schools and other issues that plagued black people south. A pivotal moment in Wells’ life was when her close friend Thomas Moss was lynched in Memphis. Wells would become known for her famous anti-lynching campaign that followed this traumatizing event (Jim Crow Stories). The lynching of Moss is known as The People’s Grocery Lynching and happened on March 2, 1982. To read more about it, you can go here (JSTOR).

Through her newspaper, Wells questioned the reason behind lynchings and to expose the violence the black people faced in the South. Her writings were published abroad and in 200 black weeklies (NYTimes). Her lynching profiles was what she became more famous for, but she was also one of the first activist to implement economic boycotts. These forms of boycotts were made famously by the sit-in and the Montgomery Bus Boycott that happened later.

Another big accomplishment that is often attributed to other people is her help with founding the National Association of Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and National Association of Colored Women (NYTimes). Wells accomplished a lot in her lifetime, but was eventually pushed out for activist like Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois.

Her life was filled with activism, bringing attention to black violence in the south and empowering black people. She was a powerful woman who didn’t backdown in the face of violence and threats. She is often forgotten about during the stories of the Civil Rights Movement.

I hope you enjoyed learning more about Ida B. Wells and our next spotlight will be Wangari Maathai so stay tuned next week to learn about the first Black Woman Nobel Peace Prize Winner.

Here are some books about Ida B. Wells if you want to read more about her.

Special Thanks

Last week I posted about my MeToo moment and the support was overwhelming and amazing. It’s always nerve-wracking and scary to post something so vulnerable. I was nervous that I would be judged. I was wrong and this is my thank you to everyone who reached out, who called me, who texted me. You showed me how much love is in the world and how much you love me. Your support while I get through this makes every bad day easier, it makes my darkness feel brighter.

This is also a special thank you to those who emailed me with your own stories. I know that cannot have been easy. Just remember, you do not owe anyone your story. It is yours to tell and do not ever feel rushed or pressured to tell it. You will when you a ready.

I got some questions asking how you can be there for a friend or family member who has been affected by sexual assault so I’m going to address some things that I think are important. I am no means a professional and if you have any questions, RAINN.org has some great resources to check out.

  1. acknowledge their pain.  – Do not try and empathize.
  2. Ask them what they need from you – this can be hard because you want to try and give advice or help them but don’t know how. The best way is to say “what can I do for you, what do you need from me?” this allows them to tell you specifically what they need.
  3. Patience – this is the hardest part because healing and recovering takes time and is different for every person. There will be bad days, and some of them can last a week, a month or just a few hours. It can vary depending on what triggers it. You have to be patient and caring when this happens and this can be hard because you do not fully grasp or understand what is going on and you don’t like watching your loved one in this bad spot. Being patient is crucial to supporting them and helping them.
  4. Love them – this seems so obvious but the biggest fear of revealing our sexual assault is being judged and shunned. Showing them that you still love them, still want to be with them and hang out with them helps alleviate this fear.

I made a playlist that will hopefully inspire you to be a bomb friend and supporter.

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Black History Month

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Today is the start of Black History Month and I wanted to do something a little different this month. This month I want to spotlight different women who were important women to Black History, with some being specific to the in the United States.

These women were pivotal people in their area of expertise, with the Civil Rights Movements and broke barriers wherever they went.

I wanted to spotlight women because they are often the forgotten people in all the stories. We hear of NASA sending someone to the moon, but we’ve only just learned of Katherine Johnson and her work towards making the launch successful. I want to say thanks to my friends who responded to my messages and gave me the names of some of these women.

Here are a list of women I am going to spotlight:

  • Ida B. Wells
  • Wangari Maathai
  • Ruthie Bridges
  • Fannie Lou Hammer
  • Marian Wright Edelman
  • Lorraine Hansberry
  • Bell Hooks
  • Hattie McDaniel

I’m excited to launch these spotlights and I hope you follow along this month. If there are any women you think should be spotlight, please let know!

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